Lichfield Cathedral appeal for toys for The Gingerbread Centre

Wednesday December 16 2015

Lichfield Cathedral is hosting a toy appeal to support a Staffordshire charity, The Gingerbread Centre, this Christmas. The Gingerbread Centre has been established for over 35 years and provides supported accommodation for families experiencing homelessness and floating support to families at risk of becoming homeless in the community.

The Cathedral is encouraging people to pick up a toy whilst they’re Christmas shopping, and bring it along to one of the two Shoppers’ Carol services on Saturday 19th December at 12pm and 4pm. All toys that are collected during these services will be donated to The Gingerbread Centre, who will distribute them to children both in the accommodation and in the community.

If you’re unable to attend the services, toys can be dropped off at the Cathedral Reception office between 9am and 5pm Monday to Friday. The Cathedral will be collecting toys suitable for ages 0-18 years.

Some of the families that approach The Gingerbread Centre for help have difficult and complex needs, and have experienced mental illness or sexual or physical abuse, which affects them as they try to manage their daily lives. The team at the Centre works very closely with parents and guardians to develop their life skills and teach them positive parenting techniques, helping them to care for their children effectively.

The facilities at The Gingerbread Centre include Rothesay Court, which accommodates homeless families in 22 flats; and Catherine Court, the second unit, which provides a stable and secure environment for 11 teenage parents.

The Very Revd Adrian Dorber, Dean of Lichfield, says: “The Gingerbread Centre does crucial work to support vulnerable families in the area. They provide around-the-clock care and offer great facilities including a communal playroom where families can interact in a safe environment. If you’re able to donate a toy for a child in need this Christmas, please consider donating to this appeal.”

For a full events listing for the Cathedral this Christmas, visit the website at www.lichfield-cathedral.org.

-ENDS-

For further information please contact Abby Wilson (Marketing Officer) at abby.wilson@lichfield-cathedral.org or on 01543 306121.

For information about The Gingerbread Centre, visit http://www.gingerbreadcentre.co.uk/

Lichfield Cathedral

Lichfield Cathedral – a centre of Christian worship for over 1300 years.

Lichfield Cathedral is one of the oldest places of Christian worship in Britain and the burial place of the great Anglo-Saxon missionary Bishop, St Chad.  It has a rich history, which is reflected in its architecture and treasures. It lies seventeen miles north of Birmingham and it is the only medieval Cathedral with three spires.  It is the Mother Church of the Church of England Diocese of Lichfield and its symbolic centre.  The Cathedral is committed to the daily offering of worship and prayer to God, and of spiritual nourishment to all who come on their own journey of search and discovery.

Cathedral Treasures

Lichfield Cathedral is home to the St Chad Gospels and the Lichfield Angel:

The St Chad Gospels, an illuminated Anglo Saxon gospel book which dates from about 730 (that is, about 50 years older than the famous Book of Kells).

Discovered in 2003 the Lichfield Angel is a remarkable survival of Saxon sculpture. The carved limestone corner-piece, which is dated to around 800 A.D., comprises three separate fragments which are thought to have formed part of a tomb chest, presumably that of St Chad (d.672).

Lighting and Rewiring Project

Lichfield Cathedral has been named as one of 31 cathedrals to receive a grant from government-sponsored scheme, the First World War Centenary Cathedral Repairs Fund. The fund was set up to support vital repairs to some of England’s most important historic buildings. Lichfield will receive £800,000, the largest of the grants, to go towards the next big fundraising development, the lighting and rewiring project. The Cathedral was facing the possibility of closure without the essential work.